No Bees, No Food

Save the Bees!

Millions of bees are dying off, with alarming consequences for our environment and our food supply. We rely on bees to pollinate everything from almonds to strawberries to the alfalfa used to feed dairy cows. What happens if the bees disappear? It’s simple: No bees, no food. 

We rely on bees to pollinate 71 of the 100 crops that provide 90% of most of the world’s food. Imagine no almonds, fewer apples and strawberries, less alfalfa to feed dairy cows, and the list goes on.

Scientists point to several causes behind the problem, including global warming, habitat loss, parasites and a class of bee-killing insecticides known as neonicotinoids (or neonics).

When seeds are treated with neonics, the chemicals work their way into the pollen and nectar of the plants — which, of course, is bad news for bees and other pollinators. Worse, for the bees and for us, neonics are about 6,000 times more toxic to bees than DDT.

Right now, we’re letting big agrichemical companies use more of the chemicals that are known to kill bees just as we’re in the midst of an unsustainable die-off in bee populations. That has to change. Now.

Join us in calling on the EPA to declare a nationwide moratorium on the use of bee-killing neonics.

Campaign Updates

Media Hit | Sustainability

Bottle bill expansion sidetracked on Beacon Hill

BOSTON —Supporters of expanding the bottle bill to cover more types of beverages were outraged by a committee vote yesterdaymorning that will likely torpedo the proposal until next January, when the next legislative session begins.

 

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Media Hit | Foods

Student-Grown Produce at Rutgers Provides Fresh, Organic Option

About one mile from Rutgers University is a plot of farmland that, for some students, is the "Garden of Eden."

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Blog Post | Sustainability

Victory: It's in the bag

Just moments ago the LA City Council voted to ban single use plastic bags - listening to the voices of students and community members who support protecting the ocean and reducing plastic pollution.

Over fifty thousand California students have signed petitions, volunteered, and made phone calls to help pass pass bag bans across the state.

Today, thanks to the efforts of students, environmental groups, and citizens across LA, we passed the biggest bag ban yet.

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Media Hit | Foods

CALPIRG Releases Subsidize Junk Food Report

CALPIRG is meeting with Congresswoman Lois Capps tomorrow to talk about the upcoming farm bill discussions and where priorities should be for federal farm subsidies.

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Media Hit | Foods

OSPIRG works to combat unhealthy food subsidies

“It makes no sense that a box of Twinkies is less expensive than a bag of carrots.”

This statement, found on the website of the Oregon Student Public Interest Research Group, summarizes the main argument against government subsidies to agribusiness firms, and is at the heart of OSPIRG’s recent “Stop Subsidizing Obesity” campaign.

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