Higher Ed

Fixing the Broken Textbook Market, Third Edition

This national survey of more than 5,000 college students was taken in September 2020, and builds on similar surveys from 2013 and 2019. It offers a snapshot in time of student experiences, particularly those at four-year institutions, in the first full semester of the pandemic and points out more long-term problems that institutions and national leaders must work to solve.

Students take to the (virtual) Capitol

No one should have to worry over lack of food or access to safe housing, especially during a pandemic. Yet, these problems are so widespread that 38 percent of college students say that they don’t have the means to meet their basic… Read more

Student Groups Outline COVID-19 Higher Ed Funding Needs

As you work on providing economic relief and protecting public health in response to the COVID-19 crisis and move forward with the FY21 appropriations process, we, the undersigned student advocacy organizations, write to urge you to invest in America’s institutions of higher education, so that they can ensure student success and support during this crisis.

Fixing the Broken Textbook Market

Despite publishers’ talking points that access codes and other digital materials have answered student’s cries for help over costs, there has been little measurable improvement in key textbook affordability measures over the last six years.

Bipartisan Progress to Make Education Accessible

We’re so proud of the amazing work our students have accomplished over the last year. But even as students are making progress at the local and statewide level, we wanted to highlight another unexpected source of progress: the federal level!

Student PIRGs praise passage of FAFSA simplification bill

WASHINGTON — The U.S. House of Representatives passed the bipartisan FUTURE Act today, which permanently funds historically black colleges and universities and other minority-serving institutions, and streamlines financial aid. Specifically, it allows the Internal Revenue Service and the Department of Education to share data that will shorten the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), and automatically re-certify the income of borrowers who are in an income-driven repayment plan.